Are You Marketing To The Masses?

On February 20, 2012, in Uncategorized, by John Ekonomou

If you’re having trouble articulating your difference, then you are probably talking to, too big of a market.  You’re addressing too many types of people, a nebulous cloud of minds that all think differently. No wonder you can’t find commonality. How does your value, your offer, your message get accepted by everyone who hears it? The […]

If you’re having trouble articulating your difference, then you are probably talking to, too big of a market.  You’re addressing too many types of people, a nebulous cloud of minds that all think differently. No wonder you can’t find commonality. How does your value, your offer, your message get accepted by everyone who hears it? The answer is, it doesn’t.

You have to be a lot pickier than that.  You must select the type of people your business will provide for. That’s because, when you select a type, you are automatically creating a category that has similar “wants, needs, and desires.” And that is more valuable than anything else you can do.

Most businesses try to show their difference by undercutting their price. When you compete on price that is also an indicator that you have a commoditized business, because the chances are, you are marketing to a broader or a general market.

So when you compete on price the value to the customer goes down because the focus is cutting costs which intern gives your customers less quality and service etc.

Out of the hundreds of businesses that I’ve worked with, there wasn’t a one that didn’t have a potential differentiation point, even amongst companies that were competing. Most of the time, bringing that uniqueness to light for businesses results in one of two reactions:

Wow! I didn’t know that people would actually pay for that differentiation.
or
No one would pay for that if we made that our differentiation point.

And yet they would pay. And they do. These two responses are quite common. What they indicate is that these people don’t understand their market, and they don’t understand because their market’s problem is not defined clearly enough.

This is when a business puts together all marketing materials and spends their hard earned money based solely on a guess. Stop Guessing and start asking your customers what can you provide for them. By the way good quality and service is a standard in business today.

Just because you think that it’s good—whatever it is—doesn’t mean your market thinks it’s good.  Just because you think it saves time, doesn’t mean that your market thinks it saves time. Just because you think it’s the most convenient thing since mac-and-cheese-in-a-box, your market might still disagree.

Making guesstimates based on what you see and hear from the marketplace in general is bad business sense. The smart approach is to know your market (your customer) because it is a distinct category and has a distinct problem that you solve. When you know your market’s distinct problem, providing value to them is easy!

The more distinct the problem is, the easier it is to identify exactly what they want to pay money for… or don’t.

Fortunately, you can avoid all of these difficulties.  These hurdles don’t have to exist.

When your business is seen as a specialized business, not a generalized business you will find that showing and articulating your difference will be a lot easier. The basic breakdown is specific people, specific businesses, and specific organizations.

Print Friendly and PDF

Spending To Much Money Trying To Get New Customers???

FromMyWhiteBoard.com

You know there are strategies you can use to lower your customer getting methods by 50% or more...

To get more customers cheaper you need to do a 3 simple things...

1. Position Yourself To Be So Different That No-One Can Compete With You...

2. Become The Obvious Choice For Your Customer

3. Make Your Marketing & Advertising Irresistible To Your Ideal Customer

Click to continue…

 

Comments are closed.